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Title

Electromagnetic Information Transfer to Water – Inhibit Microorganism Growth

This post reviews some of the work by Heredia-Rojas et al. related to transferring antimicrobial information to water via an electronic amplifier (i.e. a bio-resonance therapy, BRT, device). In particular, the scientific papers that will be discussed include: 

A. “Entamoeba Histolytica And Trichomonas Vaginalis: Trophozoite Growth Inhibition by Metronidazole Electro-Transferred Water” (2011), 

B. “Antimicrobial Effect Of Amphotericin B Electronically-Activated Water Against Candida Albicans” (2012), and 

C. “Antimicrobial Effect Of Vancomycin Electro-Transferred Water Against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Variant” (2015),

 which look at parasite, fungus, and bacteria growth inhibition respectively.

What is the purpose of the studies?

There are different methods available that try to inhibit the growth of microorganisms – some of them rely on a conventional approach (e.g. using antimicrobial drugs), while others are classified as unconventional (e.g. using electric and magnetic fields). The studies reviewed in this post investigate whether it is possible for the electromagnetic signal derived from a biologically active substance that inhibits microbial (e.g. parasite, fungus, bacteria) growth to be transferred to water samples and then influence the microorganisms mentioned above. 

How were the studies conducted?

All three studies had similar experimental set-up and included the following controls and test samples:

cells treated with pure water (negative control); 

cells treated with “sham” electro-transferred water samples (i.e. transferring information from pure water to water as a control to account for any possible artifact effect induced by the electronic device on water samples);

cells treated with the biologically active substance (positive control); and,

cells treated with electronically transferred information from a biologically active substance.

 

A. Parasite Study

In the 2011 parasite study, the electronic information of metronidazole, a drug against parasites, was transferred to water using an electronic amplifier and tested against the growth of two types of parasites: Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis.

Infoceutical of Metronidazole against Entamoeba histolytica

Fig. 1. Effect of metronidazole electro-transferred water samples on the growth of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites (HM1-IMSS strain). The amoebas were cultured in PEHPS medium, inoculated with 1 x 10trophozoites/mL and incubated at 37oC. Nine tubes were used for each treatment regime and controls, giving a total of 36 cultures. The cell density was determined in triplicate and in a blind way by using a hemocytometer Neubauer chamber.

Infoceutical of Metronidazole against Trichonomas vaginalis 

Fig. 2. Effect of metronidazole electro-transferred water samples on the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis trophozoites (GT-13 strain). The parasites were cultured in PEHPS medium, inoculated with 1 x 10trophozoites/mL and incubated at 36.5oC. Nine tubes were used for each treatment regime and controls, giving a total of 36 cultures. The cell density was determined in a hemocytometer in triplicate and in a blind way.

 

B. Fungus Study

In the 2012 fungus study, the electronic information of amphotericin B, an antifungal drug, was transferred to water using an electronic amplifier and tested against the growth of Candida albicans.

Infoceutical of Amphotericin B against Candida albicans 

Fig. 3. Effect of electronically-activated water on cultured Candida albicans growth. Vitability of C. albicans after exposure to electronically-transmitted amphotericin B to water in liquid medium was determined by a colorimetric technique. For the positive control, 125 μg·mL-1 of amphotericin B was used. Data represent mean ±SD of 8 replicates per treatment group from 3 independent experiments. 

 

C. Bacteria Study

In the 2015 bacteria study, the electronic information of vancomycin, an antibiotic, was transferred to water using an electronic amplifier and tested against the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

Infoceutical of Vancomycin against MRSA 

Fig. 4.   Effect of electro-transferred water on MRSA growth inhibition on liquid culture medium. MRSA growth after exposure to electronically-transmitted vancomycin to water in liquid culture medium was determined spectrophotometrically. For the positive controls, 4.0 μg/mL of vancomycin was used. Data represent mean ±SEM.

 

What did the studies reveal?

For all the studies, it was found that the water “charged” with the bioactive substance significantly inhibited the growth of the microorganism under investigation. For instance, water “charged” with metronidazole reduced the growth of the parasites Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis and water "charged" with antifungal amphotericin B significantly decreased the growth of cultured Candida albicans. Similarly, electronically activated water samples of the antibiotic vancomycin resulted in a significant reduction in the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). 

What does this mean?

The evidence presented by Heredia-Rojas et al. suggests that it is possible to transfer antimicrobial information to water to inhibit the growth of microorganisms, though further experimental work is needed to fully understand the mechanism by which the electro-activated water mimics the activity of an antimicrobial agent. Nevertheless, these results support the future use of informational medicine, which includes infoceuticals, in the clinical realm.

In a time when bacterial diseases are increasingly resistant to conventional treatment, other methods of treatment need to be investigated to control microbial illnesses.

Post created: Oct 29, 2018, by: Anton Sheikh-Fedorenko 1255   5

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    Dec 03, 2018, Sass Jordan says:     Not liked 2

    This is great information - please keep up the information stream with all the latest advances - we NEED this!!! Reply

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